Mock Sibert

The Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in the United States in English during the preceding year. 


Anderson’s Mock Sibert Candidates 2019

 

Beloved World of Sonia Sotomayor by Sonia Sotomator
Sonia Sotomayor was just a girl when she dared to dream big. Her dream? To become a lawyer and a judge even though she’d never met one of either, and none lived in her neighborhood.

Blacklisted!:  Hollywood, the Cold War, and the First Amendment by Larry Dane Brimner
World War II is over, but tensions between the communist Soviet Union and the US are at an all-time high. In America, communist threats are seen everywhere and a committee is formed in the nation's capital to investigate those threats.

Boots on the Ground: America’s War in Vietnam by Elizabeth Partridge
America's war in Vietnam. In over a decade of bitter fighting, it claimed the lives of more than 58,000 American soldiers and beleaguered four US presidents. More than forty years after America left Vietnam in defeat in 1975, the war remains controversial and divisive both in the United States and abroad.

Camp Panda: Helping Cubs Return to the Wild by Catherine Thimmesh
Roughly a thousand years ago, an estimated 23,000 pandas roamed wild and free through their native China. But within the past forty years, more than fifty percent of the panda’s already shrinking habitat has been destroyed by humans, leaving the beautiful and beloved giant panda vulnerable to extinction. 

Capsized!  By Patricia Sutton
On July 24, 1915, the SS Eastland, filled to capacity with 2,500 passengers and crew, capsized in the Chicago River while still moored to the pier. Happy picnic-goers headed for an employee outing across Lake Michigan suddenly found themselves in a struggle for their lives.

Champion: The Comeback Tale of the American Chestnut Tree by Sally M. Walker
American chestnut trees were once found far and wide in North America's eastern forests. They towered up to one hundred feet tall, providing food and shelter for people and animals alike.

Crash:  The Great Depression and the Fall and Rise of America by Marc Favreau
The incredible true story of how Americans from all walks of life weathered one of the most turbulent periods in our nation's history--the Great Depression--and emerged triumphant.

Crash tells the story of the Great Depression, from the sweeping fallout of the market collapse to the more personal stories of those caught up in the aftermath.

Eleanor Roosevelt, Fighter for Justice by Ilene Cooper
An eye-opening journey through Eleanor Roosevelt’s life, career, and social justice work. The author’s meticulous research creates a realistic portrayal of Roosevelt by including her achievements and also recognizing the limitations of her upbringing and status which affected Roosevelt’s social justice work

Facing Frederick by Tonya Bolden
Most folks know Frederick Douglass as an escaped slave turned abolitionist. Bolden’s insightful, and impeccably researched, biography reveals, instead, a multifaceted man who would travel many paths and constantly redefine himself.

Few Red Drops: The Chicago Race Riot of 1919 by Claire Hatfield
This mesmerizing narrative draws on contemporary accounts as it traces the roots of the explosion that had been building for decades in race relations, politics, business, and clashes of culture. 

Girl Who Drew Butterflies: How Maria Merian’s Art Changed Science by Joyce Sidman
Bugs, of all kinds, were considered to be “born of mud” and to be “beasts of the devil.”  Why would anyone, let alone a girl, want to study and observe them? One of the first naturalists to observe live insects directly, Maria Sibylla Merian was also one of the first to document the metamorphosis of the butterfly.

Golden Thread:  A Song for Pete Seeger by Colin Meloy
Pete Seeger once sang that if he had a golden thread, he would use it to weave people from all over the world to one another. That golden thread, for Pete, was music.

Joan Procter, Dragon Doctor:  The Woman Who Loved Reptiles by Patricia Valdez
While other girls played with dolls, Joan preferred the company of reptiles. She carried her favorite lizard with her everywhere—she even brought a crocodile to school!

More Deadly Than War by Ken C. Davis
This dramatic narrative, told through the stories and voices of the people caught in the deadly maelstrom, explores how this vast, global epidemic was intertwined with the horrors of World War I—and how it could happen again.

My Family Divided: One Girl’s Journey of Home, Loss, and Hope by Diane Guerrero
Diane Guerrero was a young girl living in Boston. One day, while Guerrero was at school, her undocumented immigrant parents were taken from their home, detained, and deported. Guerrero's life, which had been full of the support of a loving family, was turned upside down.

Pass Go and Collect $200: The Real Story of How Monopoly Was Invented by Tanya Lee Stone
In the late 1800s lived Lizzie Magie, a clever and charismatic woman with a strong sense of justice. Waves of urban migration drew Lizzie’s attention to rising financial inequality. One day she had an idea: create a game that shows the unfairness of the landlord-tenant relationship. But game players seemed to have the most fun pretending to be wealthy landowners.

Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How American Women Won the Right to Vote by Susan Zimet
The amendment only succeeded because a courageous group of women had been relentlessly demanding the right to vote for more than seventy years. The leaders of the suffrage movement are heroes who were fearless in the face of ridicule, arrest, imprisonment, and even torture. Many of them devoted themselves to the cause knowing they wouldn't live to cast a ballot.

So Tall Within: Sojourner Truth’s Long Walk Toward Freedom by Gary D. Schmidt
Sojourner Truth was born into slavery but possessed a mind and a vision that knew no bounds. So Tall Within traces her life from her painful childhood through her remarkable emancipation to her incredible leadership in the movement for rights for both women and African Americans. 

Spooked!: How a Radio Broadcast and the War of the Worlds Sparked the 1938 Invasion of America by Gail Jarrow
On the night of October 30, 1938, thousands of Americans panicked when they believed that Martians had invaded Earth. What appeared to be breaking news about an alien invasion was in fact a radio drama based on H. G. Wells's War of the Worlds, performed by Orson Welles and his Mercury Theatre players. 

Through the Window: Views of Marc Chagall’s Life and Art by Barb Rosenstock
Known for both his paintings and stained-glass windows, Marc Chagall rose from humble beginnings to become one of the world's most renowned artists. Admired for his use of color and the powerful emotion in his work, Chagall led a career that spanned decades and continents, and he never stopped growing. 

Unwanted: Stories of the Syrian Refugees by Don Brown
Starting in 2011, refugees flood out of war-torn Syria in Exodus-like proportions. The surprising flood of victims overwhelms neighboring countries, and chaos follows. Resentment in host nations heightens as disruption and the cost of aid grows. By 2017, many want to turn their backs on the victims. The refugees are the unwanted.

Votes for Women!: American Suffragists and the Battle for the Ballot by Winifred Conkling
For nearly 150 years, American women did not have the right to vote. On August 18, 1920, they won that right, when the 19th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified at last. To achieve that victory, some of the fiercest, most passionate women in history marched, protested, and sometimes even broke the law—for more than eight decades.

We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga by Traci Sorell
The word otsaliheliga (oh-jah-LEE-hay-lee-gah) is used by members of the Cherokee Nation to express gratitude. Beginning in the fall with the new year and ending in summer, follow a full Cherokee year of celebrations and experiences.

What Do You Do With a Voice Like That?: The Story of Extraordinary Congresswoman Barbara Jordan by Chris Barton
Even as a child growing up in the Fifth Ward of Houston, Texas, Barbara Jordan stood out for her big, bold, booming, crisp, clear, confident voice. It was a voice that made people sit up, stand up, and take notice.
So what do you do with a voice like that?

 

Participation and Voting Information

Our voting will take place in January, prior to the Sibert Award announcement at ALA Mid-Winter. Details to follow. To participate in voting, we require the complete mock set or partial set (15 books) be purchased from Anderson’s. Special discounts apply.  Contact us to order your set or for more info! 

Naperville
Sue Skells
sue.skells@andersonsbookshop.com or 
Carolyn Roys
carolyn.roys@andersonsbookshop.com
(630) 355-2665

Downers Grove 
Kathleen March
kathleen.march@andersonsbookshop.com
(630) 963-2665

LaGrange
Sue Skells
sue.skells@andersonsbookshop.com
(630) 355-2665